The Presence of Technology

Nov 07, 2012 by in Microsoft Kinect, News, Technology

 

At the same time the //Build/ conference was going down in Redmond, Washington, I was next door in Seattle for the Seattle Interactive Conference (SIC://). Besides a fondness for forward slashes, these two conferences shared a common interest in the future of technology. //Build approached this topic from the software side while SIC:// did it from the design and agency side. The Kinect for Windows technology, interestingly, was present at both events.

I was invited to SIC:// in order to represent EE on a panel about Natural User Interfaces. It was an amazing panel that included David Kung from Oblong, Matt von Trott from Assembly Ltd, Scott Snibbe from Snibbe Interactive and John Gaeta of FLOAT Hybrid. Our conversation about what NUI means today was preceded by an amazing fifteen minute talk by Oscar Murillo that showed off many K4W techniques in a holodeck-like demo. You can read more about the panel here and here. It was expertly moderated by Steve Clayton of Microsoft.

What made the event fascinating for me was the time I got to spend with the other panelists before our talk and after. There was a clear trajectory in our backgrounds. John is involved in the motion picture industry and helped design many of the futuristic movies (like The Matrix) that have inspired the rest of us to work with bleeding-edge interface technology. Dave’s company brought forward advanced academic research to actually realize Minority Report (one of Oblong’s founders helped design the gestural interface Tom Cruise uses in the movie). Microsoft turned gestural interfaces into a consumer technology. Matt, Scott and I are using it for retail and marketing which will help fund and expand the proliferation of gestural sensors. Our collective goal is to create technology that anticipates and responds to our desires rather than simply frustrating us on most days.

We want to use technology, when it comes down to it, to hide the presence of technology in our everyday lives.

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